expositionfairy:

6 Martian sunrises, as seen by the HiRISE orbiter.  Once again, not artist’s renditions.

 8
13 Jan 12 at 8 pm

(Source: )

 5
28 Oct 11 at 1 pm

From Astronomy Picture Of The Day; October 28, 2011:

October Skylights
Malcolm Park

As northern hemisphere nights grow longer, October is a good month for spotting auroras, or even other eerie apparitions after dark. And this week the night sky did not disappoint. On October 24th a solar coronal mass ejection impacted planet Earth’s magnetosphere triggering far ranging auroral displays. On that night, this dramatic silhouette against deep red and beautiful green curtains of shimmering light was captured near Whitby, Ontario, Canada. But auroras were reported even farther south, in US states like Alabama, Kansas, and Oklahoma at latitudes rarely haunted by the northern lights. Well above 100 kilometers, at the highest altitudes infused by the auroral glow, the red color comes from the excitation of oxygen atoms.

(via wigmund)


From Astronomy Picture Of The Day; October 28, 2011:
 October Skylights  Malcolm Park
As northern hemisphere nights grow longer, October is a good month for spotting auroras, or even other eerie apparitions after dark.  And this week the night sky did not disappoint.  On October 24th a solar coronal mass ejection impacted planet Earth’s magnetosphere triggering far ranging auroral displays.  On that night, this dramatic silhouette against deep red and beautiful green curtains of shimmering light was captured near Whitby, Ontario, Canada.  But auroras were reported even farther south, in US states like Alabama, Kansas, and  Oklahoma at latitudes rarely haunted by the northern lights.  Well above 100 kilometers, at the highest altitudes infused by the auroral glow, the red color comes from the excitation of oxygen atoms.

21 Oct 11 at 10 pm

Must Watch: Bill Nye, Neil deGrasse Tyson, Pamela Gay, and Lawrence Krauss discuss our future in space (feat. Phil Plait)

 15
21 Oct 11 at 12 am

From Astronomy Picture Of The Day; October 20, 2011:

Tails of Comet Garradd
Gregg Ruppel

A good target for binoculars and small telescopes, Comet Garradd (C/2009 P1) now shines in planet Earth’s evening skies, a steady performer but just below naked-eye visibility. Telescopic images like this composite from October 15 can find the comet with a lovely green coma, sporting multiple tails, and lingering against a background of faint stars. The field of view spans over 1 degree or about 2 full moons within the southern boundaries of the constellation Hercules. Now around 16 light minutes (2 astronomical units) away, P1 Garradd is an intrinsically large comet, but will never make a very close approach to Earth or the Sun while sweeping through the inner solar system. As a result, the comet will likely stay a sight for telescopic eyes only, moving slowly through the sky and remaining in Hercules during the coming months.

(via wigmund)


From Astronomy Picture Of The Day; October 20, 2011:
 Tails of Comet Garradd  Gregg Ruppel
A good target for binoculars and small telescopes, Comet Garradd (C/2009 P1) now shines in planet Earth’s evening skies, a steady performer but just below naked-eye visibility.  Telescopic images like this composite from October 15 can find the comet with a lovely green coma, sporting multiple tails, and lingering against a background of faint stars.  The field of view spans over 1 degree or about 2 full moons within the southern boundaries of the constellation Hercules.  Now around 16 light minutes (2 astronomical units) away, P1 Garradd is an intrinsically large comet, but will never make a very close approach to Earth or the Sun while sweeping through the inner solar system.  As a result, the comet will likely stay a sight for telescopic eyes only, moving slowly through the sky and remaining in Hercules during the coming months.
 13528
18 Oct 11 at 12 am

winter is coming

(via wigmund)

winter is coming

(Source: ohsofunnyjedward, via most-awkward-moments)

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14 Oct 11 at 9 pm

aerostarmonk:

spaceisbig:

Composite image of Saturn’s aurora. Hubble Space Telescope, January 2004.

What an amazing image! 

(via wigmund)

aerostarmonk:

spaceisbig:

Composite image of Saturn’s aurora. Hubble Space Telescope, January 2004.

What an amazing image! 
 22
13 Oct 11 at 11 am

Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka, are the bright bluish stars from east to west (left to right) along the diagonal in this gorgeous cosmic vista. Otherwise known as the Belt of Orion, these three blue supergiant stars are hotter and much more massive than the Sun. They lie about 1,500 light-years away, born of Orion’s well-studied interstellar clouds. In fact, clouds of gas and dust adrift in this region have intriguing and some surprisingly familiar shapes, including the dark Horsehead Nebula and Flame Nebula near Alnitak at the lower left. The famous Orion Nebula itself lies off the bottom of this colorful star field. Recorded last December with a modified digital SLR camera and small telescope, the well-planned, two frame mosaic spans about 4 degrees on the sky.

Alnitak, Alnilam, and Mintaka, are the bright bluish stars from east to west (left to right) along the diagonal in this gorgeous cosmic vista.  Otherwise known as the Belt of Orion, these three blue supergiant stars are hotter and much more massive than the Sun.  They lie about 1,500 light-years away, born of Orion’s well-studied interstellar clouds.  In fact, clouds of gas and dust adrift in this region have intriguing and some surprisingly familiar shapes, including the dark Horsehead Nebula and Flame Nebula near Alnitak at the lower left.  The famous Orion Nebula itself lies off the bottom of this colorful star field.  Recorded last December with a modified digital SLR camera and small telescope, the well-planned, two frame mosaic spans about 4 degrees on the sky.
 16333
13 Oct 11 at 10 am

flavorpill:

Suren Manvelyan’s photograph of a fish’s eye. Other amazing close-up eye photos here

(via wigmund)

flavorpill:

Suren Manvelyan’s photograph of a fish’s eye. Other amazing close-up eye photos here. 
 15
11 Oct 11 at 11 am

From Astronomy Picture Of The Day; October 11, 2011:

NGC 7635: The Bubble Nebula
Larry Van Vleet

It’s the bubble versus the cloud. NGC 7635, the Bubble Nebula, is being pushed out by the stellar wind of massive central star BD+602522. Next door, though, lives a giant molecular cloud, visible to the right. At this place in space, an irresistible force meets an immovable object in an interesting way. The cloud is able to contain the expansion of the bubble gas, but gets blasted by the hot radiation from the bubble’s central star. The radiation heats up dense regions of the molecular cloud causing it to glow. The Bubble Nebula, pictured above in scientifically mapped colors to bring up contrast, is about 10 light-years across and part of a much larger complex of stars and shells. The Bubble Nebula can be seen with a small telescope towards the constellation of the Queen of Aethiopia (Cassiopeia).

(via wigmund)


From Astronomy Picture Of The Day; October 11, 2011:
 NGC 7635: The Bubble Nebula  Larry Van Vleet
 It’s the bubble versus the cloud.  NGC 7635, the Bubble Nebula, is being pushed out by the stellar wind of massive central star BD+602522.  Next door, though, lives a giant molecular cloud, visible to the right.  At this place in space, an irresistible force meets an immovable object in an interesting way.  The cloud is able to contain the expansion of the bubble gas, but gets blasted by the hot radiation from the bubble’s central star.  The radiation heats up dense regions of the molecular cloud causing it to glow.  The Bubble Nebula, pictured above in scientifically mapped colors to bring up contrast, is about 10 light-years across and part of a much larger complex of stars and shells.  The Bubble Nebula can be seen with a small telescope towards the constellation of the Queen of Aethiopia (Cassiopeia).
An angel on the Sun